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The Glass Bees

The Glass Bees, by Ernst Junger, was originally written in 1957 but was dismissed for lacking any particularly deep insight into its time. Five decades later, it appears the novel was much more prophetic than it originally seemed. The plot takes place primarily in the mind of its protagonist, Captain Richard, as he agonizes over the possibility taking a job as a security officer for an infamous tech company. Zapparoni, the company’s head, has made a fortune in the creation of automatons. Most eminently are his glass bees which function as a prototype of drone swarm technology. What is perhaps most outstanding, however, is Junger’s ability not only to foresee what was to come, but look even beyond that:
My query is this: why are those who have endangered and changed our lives in such terrible and unpredictable ways not content with unleashing and controlling enormous forces and with enjoying their consequent fame, power, and wealth? Why must they want to be saints as well? This questio…

The Fall, Part III

This post contains spoilers for the series Altered Carbon and the drama Faust.
"I am part of that power which eternally wills evil and eternally works good.” -Faust, Johan Wolfgang Von Goethe
“Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” -Robert J. Oppenheimer, quoting the Bhagavad Gita while speaking of the atomic bomb
“The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry.” -Robert Burns
RECAP
In the first post of this series, we looked at the Luciferian Myth, mostly through the lens of John Milton’s poem, Paradise Lost. The poem provides a nuanced origin story for the conflict between good and evil. Motivated by a vain sense that it was he who was meant to be in control, Satan rebelled against God, but failed. Evil then proceeds from his ongoing attempts to recover his exalted state. In Part II, we observed these archetypes playing out in a number of sci-fi films where human civilization is upended. In these films, however, it came to light that it is not quite clear whether they are …

The Fall, Part II

Myths became images and shadows of higher ideas, and by their mysterious character inculcated a profounder veneration. -Plutarch
In the last post, we looked at of myth of Satan’s fall in order to articulate its unique characteristics. To restate: Satan is thrown out of heaven for insubordination. In Hell, he has a chance to make due. Instead, he feels compelled to continue seeking power, or at the very least, vengeance. This moves the myth beyond a simple schematic of good versus evil. But as the myth transforms into a more relatable form—incorporating universal themes of human drama—it becomes more difficult to recognize the underlying symbols.
We saw this in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. In Hell, Satan finds himself in the company of the other fallen angels who express a litany of emotions; doubt, fear, anxiety, and anger. They console and contest each other. The figure of Satan becomes relatable to the reader because he is able to interact with these other voices as normal people do. L…

The Fall

Prolegomena to the Luciferian Archetype and Myth
There is no point in trying to write about anything related to the Devil as if it can be disinterestedly. The subject never fails to elicit certain reactions. As such, we may address the two most common of those reactions head-on with the further caveat that we are not interested in propagating either. The first is fairly well known. It is the kind of thought-process that also would see a ban on everything from Halloween to Charles Darwin. A bit like how normally solitary animals have a way of finding each other over long distances, nothing draws a particular type of Christian fundamentalist out quite like the suggestion that somebody is considering the myth of Satan with anything other than gut-wrenching revulsion. This creates an obstruction to deeper introspection that is not only wrong, but also increasingly futile in our own times. The second type of reaction is more modern, but less recognized. While many people have simply grown …

The Pantheon Bar

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AlejandroJodorowsky’s film The Holy Mountain follows the journey of a Christ-like character known only as ‘The Thief’ as he comes under the tutelage of a Master Alchemist. His goal is to achieve a spiritual transmutation, or enlightenment, by seeking out the Holy Mountain. The Thief is accompanied by seven companions who travel with him through a series of spiritual revelations. Towards the end of the film, the group comes to a place called Lotus Island. There they are approached by a host who offers congratulations on a successful journey and invites them to join him at The Pantheon Bar where a raucous party is underway. The Host explains that this is where the spiritual masters gather to celebrate their achievements. The group is given a sampling of the party’s attendants.
The group is first brought to an orator, who explains that enlightenment resides in his speech. He claims that his poems may manifest flowers and the bees would then come to suckle at his living poetry. But when t…

New short story, "Events"

In a futuristic metropolis, calculated floods are used to build a sense of community in a yuppie neighborhood, but not all residents feel the same about it. (PDF)

Available Here